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Upload or Modify Extended Abstract, Handout, and/or Presentation

Abstract Modification Paper Program Deadline:
15 November 2013

Final Extended Abstract Deadline:
6 March 2014

An abstract fee of $95 (payable by credit card or purchase order) is charged at the time of submission (refundable only if abstract is not accepted).

Authors of accepted presentations will be notified via e-mail by late-September 2013.

All abstracts, extended abstracts and presentations will be available on the AMS Web site at no cost.

 

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Second Symposium on Prediction of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Impacts on Weather and Climate Extremes

Program: Conferences, Symposia, and Town Halls
View by day and at-a-glance, includes author index and personal scheduler

Call for Papers

The Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is the most prominent mode of tropical intraseasonal variability in the climate system. The influence of the MJO has been demonstrated in monsoon systems, precipitation and temperature, upper ocean variability in the tropics and high latitudes, tropical–extratropical teleconnection patterns. Especially, the MJO influences weather extremes, such as tropical cyclones and hurricanes, flood, fire, and climate extremes, such as ENSO and NAO. Monitoring and forecasting the MJO and its global impacts can bring substantial benefits for the economies and societies. We propose a special symposium to be held at the AMS 2014 Annual Meeting.  The Symposium will focus on impacts of the MJO on weather and climate extreme and naturally fits to the 2014 AMS Annual Meeting theme of “Weather and Climate extremes.”

The symposium is proposed to cover theoretical, observational, modeling, predictability and forecast studies on MJO interaction with and impacts on the following topics:

  • Extreme weather events, such as precipitation, floods, fire, tornados, lightning, cold outbreaks and heat waves, tropical cyclones and hurricanes;
  • Climate modes, such as ENSO, NAO, AAO, IOD, and their impacts on global weather;
  • Crucial climate phenomena, such as the Indonesian throughflow, Wyrtki jets, circumpolar circulation, ITCZ, tropopause, and monsoons;
  • Atmospheric circulations, especially tropical-extratropical teleconnections;
  • Crucial components in the Earth System, such as atmospheric composition, aerosol, upper-ocean primary production, sea level height, and sea ice.

The proposed symposium will include invited talks, regular oral and postal presentations and will be organized within the Fifth Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy. The symposium is expected to draw participants from academia, research institutes, operational forecast centers, private forecast and consulting companies worldwide.

For additional information, please contact Charles Jones (e-mail: cjones@eri.ucsb.edu) or Bradford S. Barrett (e-mail: bbarrett@usna.edu).